Review findings reverse prediction on compound link with type 2 diabetes

This post was originally published on this site

High levels of compounds which are normally associated with oxidative stress could actually indicate positive health outcomes regarding type 2 diabetes, according to a research review.
A team from the School of Public Health at Georgia State University looked at F2-isoprostanes, compounds which can be found in a person’s human tissues and bodily fluids.
The research review brought together 132 publications which had previously concentrated on obesity and type 2 diabetes among different ethnicities around the world.
The aim was to find a link between increased F2-isoprostane levels and type 2 diabetes, but they found the opposite in their findings.
Elevated levels of F2-isoprostane were actually associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, which was attributed to altered energy metabolism.
F2-isoprostanes are usually linked with oxidative stress, which is a process that can cause chronic conditions such as Alzheimer’s, cancer, and other chronic inflammatory diseases.
It has been widely thought that the compounds can be affected by diet, exercise and other lifestyle choices make, which is why researchers had previously thought high levels might indicate an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.
They wrote: “It is widely thought that F2-isoprostanes can be affected by diet, exercise and other lifestyle choices make, which is why researchers had previously thought high levels of the compound might indicate type 2 diabetes.
“However, an increasing body of evidence suggests a change [in] the conceptual understanding of the role systemic F2-isoprostanes play in human health, which may result in a shift opposite to the current direction – toward interventions aimed to increase systemic F2-isoprostanes levels.”
The researchers concluded that urinary F2-isoprostanes could form the basis of targeted interventions to prevent obesity and type 2 diabetes.
The findings have been published in Diversity and Equality in Health and Care.